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Facial recognition at airports

Facial recognition does not have the best reputation in this country. It is generally associated with issues like surveillance, security checks, and border controls. In addition, many people have concerns about their privacy if they were able to be scanned in a public place.

It would be simpler in places where identification is necessary – such as when passengers check in at airports. “Here, facial recognition definitely offers added value that will be recognised by passengers,” explained Tugberk Duman, Technology Consultant at the Finnish company Futurice GmbH, from the eTravel Stage at ITB Berlin.

Futurice carried out a pilot trial with facial recognition software at the airport in Helsinki. Here, passengers could scan their face with an app on their smartphone and use it to register for check-in. “While passengers were making their way to the check-in desk, they were identified and assigned. Their boarding passes were then already printed,” said Duman.

Success. In a short interview film, passengers expressed consistent approval. “You don’t even need to take out your documents anymore,” said one guest, full of praise. “And everything went very quickly.” Everyone who responded said they would participate in further tests. Data protection is guaranteed, added Duman: it includes the right to be forgotten and to transparency, anonymisation, and pseudonymisation.

The volume of passengers worldwide will double by 2036, says Duman. International air transport organisations are desperately searching for solutions that will make processes at airports more efficient.

Facial recognition does not have the best reputation in this country. It is generally associated with issues like surveillance, security checks, and border controls. In addition, many people have concerns about their privacy if they were able to be scanned in a public place.

It would be simpler in places where identification is necessary – such as when passengers check in at airports. “Here, facial recognition definitely offers added value that will be recognised by passengers,” explained Tugberk Duman, Technology Consultant at the Finnish company Futurice GmbH, from the eTravel Stage at ITB Berlin.

Futurice carried out a pilot trial with facial recognition software at the airport in Helsinki. Here, passengers could scan their face with an app on their smartphone and use it to register for check-in. “While passengers were making their way to the check-in desk, they were identified and assigned. Their boarding passes were then already printed,” said Duman.

Success. In a short interview film, passengers expressed consistent approval. “You don’t even need to take out your documents anymore,” said one guest, full of praise. “And everything went very quickly.” Everyone who responded said they would participate in further tests. Data protection is guaranteed, added Duman: it includes the right to be forgotten and to transparency, anonymisation, and pseudonymisation.

The volume of passengers worldwide will double by 2036, says Duman. International air transport organisations are desperately searching for solutions that will make processes at airports more efficient.

Mirko Heinemann

www.futurice.com

Hall 6.1

Press contact: Gian Casanova

E-Mail: Gian.Casanova@futurice.com

Tel.: +49 176 1101 7708

 

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